Category: Astronomy



Women are Worth Something!…But what have they done Lately?
http://www.tecca.com/pictures/for-ada-lovelace-day-9-women-who-left-their-mark-in-science-and-technology/1/#TeccaPhotoID=1

For Ada Lovelace Day, 9 women who left their mark in science and technology

From the first computer program to radiation, we wouldn’t be where we are today without their contributions.

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Martian Volcano!


Martian Volcano!
http://news.yahoo.com/photos/mars-volcano-1320955000-slideshow/mars-volcano-photo-1320954869.html
Mars volcano The area surrounding the mountainous landmark is relatively bare, causing the huge Martian structure to stand out. When active, Tharsis Tholus was likely much larger than it is today. Image Credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum). Photo courtesy of Tecca

Mars volcanoThe planet Mars is a bit of an obsession for the human race. We’ve romanticized the red planet in everything from movies to video games, and we can’t seem to get enough of the barren, desert-like planet. The European Space Agency isn’t immune to Mars lust, and the organization recently released some stunning images of one of the planet’s most striking features: the Tharsis Tholus volcano. Presented with false color to highlight its geographical features, the once-lively mountain is still a sight to behold. Join us as we take a tour of a true Martian landmark. Image Credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum). Photo courtesy of TeccaMars volcanoThe Tharsis Tholis volcano stands 5 miles tall on the rocky Martian landscape, dwarfing the tallest volcanoes on Earth. Ojos del Salado on the Argentina-Chile border comes closest, measuring 4.2 miles tall. Image Credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum). Photo courtesy of Tecca

 

Mars volcanoThe expansive crater located in the center of the volcano resulted from the loss of supportive magma that the mountain spewed billions of years ago. With the interior of the volcano lost, its roof caved in, forming the giant hole we see today. Image Credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum). Photo courtesy of Tecca

 

Mars volcano

Over the course of billions of years, Tharsis Tholus has become dotted with the scars of small to medium-sized impacts from space debris. The mountain is in an advanced state of erosion, making it particularly interesting to scientists looking to study the history of the red planet. Image Credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum). Photo courtesy of Tecca

Mars volcanoTharsis Tholus’ large size is aided by the relatively low gravity of Mars. With less than half of the gravitational force of Earth, it is easier for huge geographical features to exist on the Martian landscape. Image Credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum). Photo courtesy of Tecca

 


Gotcha Moon Right and Left Here, or Turn the Other Cheek!

HAPPY HALLOWEEN!!!
Happy Halloween!!
You’ve been Mooned!!
One rule to this game….
You can NOT get 
someone who has already gotten you!
Now…
go out there and get as many people as you can,
before they get you!
I got you first! and you can’t get me back!

Nana – Nana – Nana!
(ha ha)
HAPPY HALLOWEEN!!!

Astronomer admits to stellar pedophilia, youngest known planet captured on telescopic image!

Must be really small balls to need a telescope!

Photos deemed to graphic for public disclosure!

Only an artistic rendition allowed for public viewing!

Check out the littlest painted dusty ball before that too is banned!

http://news.yahoo.com/hawaii-astronomer-captures-image-forming-planet-230958310.html

In this undated artists rendering provided by the University of Hawaii, a new planet forming around a star is seen. The Institute for Astronomy said in a statement Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2011, Adam Kraus and his colleague Michael Ireland from Macquarie University and the Australian Astronomical Observatory used Keck telescopes on Mauna Kea to find the planet. LkCa 15 b is 450 light years away from Earth and is being built by dust and gas. It’s the youngest planet ever found. (AP Photo/ University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy, Karen L. Teramura)

University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy, Karen L. Teramura – n this undated artists rendering provided by the University of Hawaii, a new planet forming around a star is seen. The Institute for Astronomyy said in a statement Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2011, Adam Kraus and his colleague Michael Ireland from Macquarie University and the Australian Astronomical Observatory used Keck telescopes on Mauna Kea to find the planet. LkCa 15 b is 450 light years away from Earth and is being built by dust and gas. It’s the youngest planet ever found. (AP Photo/ University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy, Karen L. Teramura)

HONOLULU (AP) — Astronomers have captured the first direct image of a planet being born.

Adam Kraus, of the University of Hawaii’s Institute for Astronomy, said the planet is being formed out of dust and gas circling a 2-milion-year-old star about 450 light years from Earth.

The planet itself, based on scientific models of how planets form, is estimated to have started taking shape about 50,000 to 100,000 years ago.

Called LkCa 15 b, it’s the youngest planet ever observed. The previous record holder was about five times older.

Kraus and his colleague, Michael Ireland from Macquarie Universityand the Australian Astronomical Observatory, used Keck telescopes on Mauna Kea to find the planet.

“We’re catching this object at the perfect time. We see this young star, it has a disc around it that planets are probably forming out of and we see something right in the middle of a gap in the disc,” Kraus said in a telephone interview.

Kraus presented the discovery Wednesday at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. Kraus and Ireland’s research paper on the discovery is due to appear in The Astrophysical Journal.

Observing planets while they’re forming can help scientists answer questions like whether planets form early in the life of a star or later, and whether they form relatively close to stars or farther away.

Planets can change orbits after forming, so it’s difficult to answer such questions by studying older planets.

“These very basic questions of when and where are best answered when you can actually see the planet forming, as the process is happening right now,” Kraus said.

Other planets may also be forming around the same star. Kraus said he’ll continue to observe the star and hopefully will see other planets if there are in fact more.

Scientists hadn’t been able to see such young planets before because the bright light of the stars they’re orbiting outshines them.

Kraus and Ireland used two techniques to overcome this obstacle.

One method, which is also used by other astronomers, was to change the shape of their mirror to remove light distortions created by the Earth’s atmosphere.

The other, unique method they used was to put masks over most of the telescope mirror. The combination of these two techniques allowed the astronomers to obtain high-resolution images that let them see the faint planet next to the bright star.

The astronomers found the planet while surveying 150 young dusty stars. This led to a more concentrated study of a dozen stars.

The star LkCa 15 — the planet is named after its star — was the team’s second target. They immediately knew they were seeing something new, so they gathered more data on the star a year later.